The Rarest Coin in the United States

Kenneth Goldman, a coin dealer and expert in rare coins, has served as president of Kenneth Goldman, Inc., since 1976. A highly regarded coin dealer and qualified appraiser of rare coins, he has used his expertise to assist both the New York Attorney General’s office and the Federal Trade Commission. Kenneth Goldman has also contributed to A Guidebook of United States coins for nearly four decades.

Coin collecting is a popular hobby practiced by as many as 10 million people in the United States alone. Collectors gather coins for a variety of reasons, and a collection that is valuable to one collector may hold little interest for another. However, there are a number of unique coins that any collector would love to possess. One such coin is the 1804 silver dollar, which many collectors believe to be the rarest, most valuable American coin ever minted. The story behind the coin is interesting, as no silver dollars were minted in 1804. About 15,000 dollars were authorized that year, but still ran with the 1803 print and could not be distinguished from the previous year’s batch.

In 1834, however, a select few 1804 silver dollars were minted in order to complete sets offered as gifts to foreign leaders. Additional coins were illegally minted around 1860. To date, less than 20 coins exist and recent sales for the legendary coin have been in the $2 to $3 Million Dollar range. Mr. Goldman owned one of these coins and is pleased to have his name included among the elite group of numismatists who have ever owned one of the 1804 Silver Dollars.

Mr. Goldman can be reached for consultation in buying, selling and trading rare coins at Kenneth Goldman Inc., P. O. Box 920404, Needham, MA. 02492.
E-Mail: KenGoldman@aol.com
PHONE 781-449-0058

We look forward to hearing from you !!

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